Tuesday, April 1, 2014

A Review of New Dimensions of Being, by Nora Caron

 (2013, Homebound Publications, ISBN: 978-1-938846-11-3)

In 2009 I had the pleasure of reading and reviewing the first novel in the New Dimensions Trilogy, Journey to the Heart. Like her main character’s spiritual journey, Nora Caron’s journey as a writer is steadily developing, and I gleaned even more from the follow-up than I did from the original.

In Mexico for about a year, Lucina, a Canadian transplant trying to find herself and break from the dysfunctional habits that had so limited her life, is living with Teleo, the medicine man from Journey to the Heart, who is the son of the old wise woman, Señora Labotta.

Lucina, although progressing in her journey, is far from over her acerbic, sarcastic tendencies, and even in this new world of spirit and oneness, when in crisis [which is often] she falls back to the advice of her more traditionally based former therapist, Dr. Field.

Themes like spirit and matter, love and loss, and life and death course through the novel, and we meet several new characters who walk the razor’s edge between them. There is John, a rough-and-tumble holy man; Mathias, a good-looking stud unlucky in love; and his female counterpart, Maria—a former Hollywood actress who schools Lucina on a variety of matters of the heart, including the personality archetype of the Vampire (Caron herself is an actress and screenwriter who lives in Montreal with an office in Los Angeles).

As we join Lucina in the dark night of her soul, the guides and companions she encounters share a plethora of potent and profound spiritual wisdoms—from the prophecies of the Hopi and the Mayans, to the harnessing of the Sacred Feminine Energies, to the interpretation of dreams. Of great importance to our present state of being is the notion of time speeding up as humanity edges ever closer to a shift in consciousness, and Caron elucidates these ideas as well as writers and lecturers like James Redfield, Wayne Dyer, and Caroline Myss.

Lucina’s commitment is matched only by her self-doubt and now-and-again retreats into her former habits. All of us, no matter how long we have studied matters of Soul and Spirit, no matter how long we have walked upon our journey, can both empathize and derive a measure of comfort from this well-told tale of one woman’s journey into a “new dimension of being.”

This book, the second in a trilogy, ends with just enough of a cliffhanger to create anticipation for the third in the series, Jaguar Dreams, due out in June of this year.

I look forward to reading it. 

Some words about the author, because one senses that she and Lucina overlap in more than a few areas of life. A native of Montreal, Quebec, Nora’s education and passion include photography and film, as well as English literature, with an emphasis on the Renaissance and the great bard, William Shakespeare. She is fluent in French, English, Spanish, and German. She has also co-written a feature Western called Wyoming Sky through her production company, Oceandoll Productions.







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